Thursday, March 1, 2012

Harbor area known as Manchester

The Harbor Was Known As Manchester Then

        In that period (early 1800’s) the Harbor was called “Manchester”. It was a large, important place, in fact more so than the uptown section, because of the fact that nearly all the travel between Cleveland and Buffalo was by water.
       The first bridge over the river was called a float bridge, built of logs. Capt.  G. A. Thayer built the two following bridges over the river; these were known as bridges.  The forth bridge was the first one erected with permanent abutments. They were located at the site of the present swing bridge.

      The building which a 100 years ago was used as a tavern, still standing at the end of Walnut street, on the hill, next to the Dalton property. The tavern was kept by a man named Joel Thomas. Later this man operated a grocery store near the corner of Lake and Prospect  streets.

Note: this is the last article I have from the 1919 Star Beacon. It was compiled by Glenn H. Leggett and his column was called “Little Stories
The Harbor Was Known As Manchester Then
        In that period (early 1800’s) the Harbor was called “Manchester”. It was a large, important place, in fact more so than the uptown section, because of the fact that nearly all the travel between Cleveland and Buffalo was by water.
       The first bridge over the river was called a float bridge, built of logs. Capt.  G. A. Thayer built the two following bridges over the river; these were known as bridges.  The forth bridge was the first one erected with permanent abutments. They were located at the site of the present swing bridge.
      The building which a 100 years ago was used as a tavern, still standing at the end of Walnut street, on the hill, next to the Dalton property. The tavern was kept by a man named Joel Thomas. Later this man operated a grocery store near the corner of Lake and Prospect  streets.
Note: this is the last article I have from the 1919 Star Beacon. It was compiled by Glenn H. Leggett and his column was called “Little Stories of Ashtabula”
There is also an ad at the bottom in a separate box that reads:
Announcement Extraordinary
New York Philharmonic Orchestra
(90 men)
Saturday Evening, March 20
High School Auditorium, 8:30 0’clock
Seats $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00
Box office open Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 3-5 p.m. Open Friday and Saturday all day.
Note: I assume they mean Ashtabula High School
of Ashtabula”

There is also an ad at the bottom in a separate box that reads:

Announcement Extraordinary

New York Philharmonic Orchestra

(90 men)

Saturday Evening, March 20

High School Auditorium, 8:30 0’clock

Seats $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00

Box office open Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 3-5 p.m. Open Friday and Saturday all day.

Note: I assume they mean Ashtabula High School

2 comments:

  1. Welcome to the GeneaBloggers family. Hope you find the association fruitful; I sure do. I have found it most stimulating, especially some of the Daily Themes.

    May you keep sharing your ancestor stories!

    Dr. Bill ;-)
    http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/
    Author of "13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories" and family saga novels:
    "Back to the Homeplace" and "The Homeplace Revisited"
    http://thehomeplaceseries.blogspot.com/
    http://www.examiner.com/x-53135-Springfield-Genealogy-Examiner
    http://www.examiner.com/x-58285-Ozarks-Cultural-Heritage-Examiner

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  2. I like those ticket prices. :-)
    Regards,
    Theresa (Tangled Trees)

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